Feed on
Posts
Comments

beware the coyote

Later in the night, after trapping the one cat and resetting the two traps, I talked with my TNR mentor. I shared with her about this TNR site, being in the middle of no-where, with no houses around for miles. She was a bit surprised that we were leaving the traps open all night, she asked what I had done to secure the traps against coyotes? She went on to tell me she has heard stories of cats being stuck in traps while coyotes try to work over the traps to get to the defenseless, terrified cat, sometimes dragging the traps great distances.

My anxiety spiked, I hadn’t thought of that. Was I setting some poor cat up for a horrid death? The traps were hidden in some trees in a small strip of earth sandwiched between a road and a river.

Screen shot 2013-04-05 at 7.12.32 AM

Horrific visions of coyotes dragging an occupied cat down the river bank and inadvertently knocking it into the river filled my mind. With those images dancing in my head I tried to sleep and vowed to get up extra early to check the traps and prayed like crazy the coyotes would be elsewhere this night.

Needless to say, I was a bit worried when I drove out to the site early in the morning as to what I might find. Thankfully, all was well and the light orange, fluffy kitty was huddled in a trap! Seeing him made me happy, as we had successfully trapped both cats even with the trap snafu the day before.

bp5

Both cats were taken to the spay/neuter clinic later that morning. The fluffy orange one was the boy and the fluffy darker calico was the girl. Both were intact and she was in heat, so it’s good we got them when we did! We still believe both were abandoned pets, so they will be cleaned up and prepared for being adopted into a new forever home.

Lesson #46: When trapping overnight, always secure traps so coyotes can’t drag them away.

8 Responses to “beware the coyote”

  1. Fuzzy Tales says:

    Oh, well done! And a huge sigh of relief that the worst case scenarios didn’t come to pass.

    Purrs to both cats that they’ll be easily/quickly re-socialized with humans, and that they’ll find amazing forever homes!

  2. Katie Isabella says:

    who would have thought!!! Thank God someone did.

  3. Marg says:

    I think most people that do the TNR, stay with the traps simply because you can catch all kinds of animals, such as skunks, possoms, and raccoons. If you catch a skunk, your trap is just about ruined. Glad a coyote didn’t get to the traps.

  4. glad you caught them both and they will have a chance at a new home.

    NEVER thought about coyotes….something new to worry about :)

  5. Greg_1948 says:

    Coyotes love to eat cats. I used to live next to a farm with some very elderly ladies living upon it. All of their cats got eaten by coyotes. I could see the coyotes outside my bedroom window. My cat run was always closed at night! All that was found of the cats were the heads and collars! What a gruesome discovery that would be. Then they ate the rabbits in their rabbit hutches, and finally, a flock of geese they kept. I saw a coyote take one right outside my bedroom window, but there was nothing i could do. That was the final end to all their animals. I have not seen any lately, but sometimes hear them.

  6. Wow I would not have thought of that either! Glad both kitties are ok and hoping they find forever homes. They are both very pretty cats! Proud of the work you do!

    hugs, Linda

  7. nancy says:

    We abide by a self-imposed rule of NEVER leaving a set trap unattended. TOO MANY close calls, as cats can get injured during the trapping process. We have found that cats get used to eating during a specific time period very quickly so it’s easy to trap during these time slots. We have successfully done TNR for over 200 cats without ever leaving a trap overnight or even unattended.

Leave a comment